The 10 Best Baking Powder Substitutes We Bet You Didn’t Know About

Chris Starks
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Test Your Baking Powder

You can test the baking powder of your dried goods to find out whether they will still be fresh by using a mixture of vinegar and flour. You can easily tell buy just observing any reactions between the two. If there are bubbles that appear, the baking powder is still fine.

You mix one-fourth cup of vinegar with one cup of water beforehand. You then slowly add a teaspoon of vinegar to some flour while mixing. If the mixture bubbles and you see large, moderately sized bubbles rising up, it means your baking powder is still good. However, if you do not see any bubbles, or if the bubbles are really small or fast rising, it means your baking powder has gone bad and that it should be replaced.

Make Your Own Baking Powder Substitute

There are times when you may find yourself stuck without baking powder. Many recipes call for baking powder as a leavening agent. This is specially useful when cooking layer cakes or other desserts that need rising. Making your own substitute is easy so you don’t have to buy a whole container every time you need it.

The recipe is very simple. Just mix 1 teaspoon of baking soda with 1/8 teaspoon of cream of tartar. Mix and put it on the pantry shelf. This will keep for six months to at least a year. One advantage of homemade baking powder is that it doesn’t have any added preservatives. Normally, larger containers of baking powder are canned to prevent deterioration. Canning and other processes can sometimes add preservatives.

Cream of Tartar

Before baking powder was invented back in the 1800s, cream of tartar was one of the few alternatives. Cream of tartar is a byproduct of winemaking. It works by producing small amounts of carbon dioxide when mixed with liquids, like eggs or water, which causes it to expand. You can produce carbon dioxide by adding an acid such as the citric acid in lemon juice to cream of tartar. Cream of tartar is stable even if it's exposed to moisture, so it works well in savory recipes, biscuits, and cakes.

However, citric acid is not readily available to most people. Plus, cream of tartar can only store for a few months at most. So for the convenience and consistency of baking powder, cream of tartar is not very useful.

Plain Yogurt

You can use plain yogurt to make your baked goods nice and fluffy, the same way that baking powder does. Just add half a teaspoon of baking powder to every eight ounces of yogurt. Just give the mixture a whisk before measuring your yogurt and baking powder into your recipe.

If your recipe calls for baking soda and you don’t have any, just substitute it with baking powder. This is because baking soda and baking powder are closely related and have the same chemical properties. Baking soda is an alkaline base whereas baking powder is a mixture of an acid salt, a base, and cornstarch. However, they basically work the same way and this substitution can work in only some baked goods.

One of the most basic ingredients in baking, baking powder is also one of the most important. When combined with other ingredients such as flour and liquid, baking powder activates and produces carbon dioxide to give your batter the rising power it needs. The result is baked goods that are light, fluffy, and tender.

It’s a magical chemical reaction, but if you run out of baking powder, you may find yourself in a jam. Everyone’s baking powder supply gets depleted every once in a while and, if you’re in a pinch, here are a few baking powder substitutes you can use to keep the batter’s rising power intact.

Though baking soda and baking powder are commonly confused due to their chemical properties, they are two separate leavening agents. Baking soda is a leavening agent that’s used to give a quick lift to a recipe. Baking powder, on the other hand, isn’t used until after the mixer or processor runs. When it sets off, baking powder releases carbon dioxide that builds into air bubbles in the batter, and it helps form a batter structure that’s high and light.

Buttermilk

Buttermilk is used as a substitute for baking powder in recipes like pancakes, waffles, and biscuits. It is also used to create a lighter texture in things like muffins and cake.

Baking powder is a mixture of baking soda and one or more acidic ingredients. The powders react with moist to create carbon dioxide bubbles that leaven your baked goods. Without it, you’d have flat breads. Fortunately, this is a problem that is easily fixed by using buttermilk as a substitute for baking powder.

Buttermilk is calcium-rich dairy product with an acidic pH of 4.2—4.5. The baking powder reacts to the low pH of the acidic buttermilk and causes the chemistry to go into action. The mixture will bubble the same way baking powder would have. You can use the substitution when you need to maintain the texture in your baked goods.

If you don’t have buttermilk and need your recipe to rise, you can make your own buttermilk substitute by combining 1 tablespoon of lemon juice or white vinegar with one cup of milk. Let the mixture stand for five minutes before using it.

One of the most basic ingredients in baking, baking powder is also one of the most important. When combined with other ingredients such as flour and liquid, baking powder activates and produces carbon dioxide to give your batter the rising power it needs. The result is baked goods that are light, fluffy, and tender.

It’s a magical chemical reaction, but if you run out of baking powder, you may find yourself in a jam. Everyone’s baking powder supply gets depleted every once in a while and, if you’re in a pinch, here are a few baking powder substitutes you can use to keep the batter’s rising power intact.

Though baking soda and baking powder are commonly confused due to their chemical properties, they are two separate leavening agents. Baking soda is a leavening agent that’s used to give a quick lift to a recipe. Baking powder, on the other hand, isn’t used until after the mixer or processor runs. When it sets off, baking powder releases carbon dioxide that builds into air bubbles in the batter, and it helps form a batter structure that’s high and light.

Lemon Juice

Just as you turn to cream of tartar when baking powder is discontinued in a recipe, you can use lemon juice as a substitute when there’s no baking powder in the house. You can only use lemon juice in recipes that include an acidic ingredient or in recipes that already contain an acidic ingredient.

For example, if an apple pie recipe calls for two tablespoons of baking powder, you can make it with lemon juice and one tablespoon of sugar instead.

To substitute lemon juice for baking powder in a recipe, use the following formula: 1/2 teaspoon = 1 teaspoon lemon juice, 1 teaspoon lemon juice = 1/2 tablespoon of baking powder. Substituting lemon juice for baking powder will give the dish a slight lemon flavor. Chose this trick when you want to change the flavor of a dish by adding lemon juice, but you don’t want to completely change the dish.

Sour milk

One of the most problematic ingredients for people with yeast allergies is cake and cookie mixes. This is because the yeast used in preparing cookie dough causes a chemical reaction when it comes in contact with milk or buttermilk. The acid in the milk activates the yeast and causes it to activate its leavening properties, which is what causes cookies and cakes to rise.

While some people use baking soda as a substitute for baking powder, baking soda causes the opposite effect when mixed with the acidic ingredients in cookies. For example, if you use baking soda in your chocolate chip cookies, the dough will rise, but the end result is a flat cookie. This is because baking soda is an acid neutralizer, and when it comes into contact with the buttermilk in the cookies, it causes a chemical reaction that produces too much gas. This is exactly what you don’t want in cookies!

The solution is to mix baking powder with additional acids, such as sour cream, yogurt, lemon juice and vinegar. In this way, you get the rise you want from the baking powder, but it is balanced by the additional acid to give your cookies their optimal texture.

Molasses

Molasses is a great substitute for baking powder and it has a long shelf life. It can be substituted for its equivalent amount of baking powder in recipes.

Vinegar

Baking Powder & Yeast Replacements As Natural Leavening Agents.

In the past few years, the names of each and every thing that comes out from a factory was generally artificial. This trend is due to the increasing awareness of the negative effects of many chemicals with which we surround ourselves. The most important thing is to understand that what you have in the kitchen is naturally better than all the rest. Many of these components are not or, at least, are less harmful than the common additives.

The same also applies to baking powder. The product may sound like a very simple one, but the truth is that it can damage your body if you use it extensively. So, for many, it is wiser to avoid it. It is much better to use natural substances to replace the powders nature has provided.

Here's an example. These are some baking powder replacements you can use in your kitchen. They may not be the only ones, but they are the best we've come across.

Whipped Egg Whites

What can we use instead of baking powder when making meringues and whipped egg whites?

The truth is there are very few alternatives to using baking powder when making meringues and whipped egg whites. Baking powder is a chemical leavening agent and activating it requires heat. So it's the magic that makes your egg whites billow up and your meringue to stiffen within a relatively short period of time.

So how do we fix the problem of baking powder that has lost its fizz? Well, you can go with the tried & tested formula of adding 1 teaspoon cream of tartar for every 3 teaspoons baking powder your recipe calls for.

This will help restore the fizzy part of the baking powder to your egg whites and meringue.

Another trick is to combine baking powder with vinegar or lemon juice and use it to gently lift and separate the egg whites. Alternatively, you can also use a splash of vinegar or lemon juice to lower the egg whites and it helps them rise and stiffen due to the acidity.

Self-rising Flour

This is the easiest swap that you can make. Self-rising flour is a flour that already has the leavening agent in it. So, you add the other dry ingredients, and you don’t need to add the leavening agent.

This swap also makes the most sense. The leavening agent is not an ingredient that you already have in your home. If you do not need it, then why bother using it? This will also help you reduce your grocery bill as buying baking powder is very expensive.

You just add the oil instead of shortening.

Oil is a better option when baking, and it works best with many ingredients.

You can use apple sauce instead of eggs. One of the most common and best alternatives to eggs is using apple sauce as an alternative. The consistency can be a little different, but it's still good depending on what you're using it for.

You can use orange juice instead of buttermilk if desired.

Without buttermilk, your pancake will not be the same, but it will still be tasty.

With just three ingredients, it is easy enough to make baking powder at home.

It might not work great all of the time, but it is the best alternative that you will find with three ingredients.

With just five ingredients, it is easy to make them as well.

Club soda

Club soda is not only great for your beverage dispenser, but can also be used as an all-purpose rising agent. So if your soda runs low, or you’re in a pinch, always know that club soda can be used as a substitute for baking powder. Just know that the rising times in the recipe will be affected and that the end result will be less leavened than with vanilla baking powder.

But why would you need to use this alternative? It involves a tricky chemical reaction called the “carbon dioxide buildup”:

In order to get the soda to react with the baking soda, you first need to dissolve the baking soda in water. After that, the reaction continues as gas bubbles are forced out. The resulting gas then carbonates the soda.

One way to illustrate the difference between carbonation and chemical reaction is to compare carbon dioxide buildup to blowing up a balloon. Like the soda solution, a blown-up balloon is full of carbon dioxide gas. But the gas that makes the balloon full is actually multiple tiny bubbles under tension; the bubbles in the soda's solution is exactly the same thing.

The carbon dioxide buildup continues until the pressure from the bubbles bursts the balloon, just that the chemical reaction "busting" the bubbles happens a bit slower with baking soda and club soda.

Still, it’s not exactly baking soda.

The Bottom Line

The reason most people only have baking powder on hand when baking is simple: It’s a pretty inexpensive ingredient, so it’s economical to add it to your pantry for future reference. Should a recipe call for an acidic ingredient, like buttermilk, baking powder also acts as a leavening agent (foam-creator) to help get your batter to rise and lighten up.

But we at Plain Chicken like to take a multipurpose approach to our cooking in the kitchen. Truth be told, baking powder is not something we use often, so we need to get a little creative in our substitute search for baking powder.

Fortunately, there are some tips and tricks we can utilize to make baking powder last as long as possible. All you have to do is combine a base ingredient and an acid ingredient. The acid also increases the shelf life of the baking powder so it can be used for longer periods of time.

I hope you can try some tips here. This is a good way to increase the shelf life of baking powder at home.